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What to use for a windshield sealant?


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#1 Randy B

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Posted 13 November 2008 - 08:38 AM

Anyone have any suggestions for what type of windshield sealant to use when I replace my windshield? LMC sells a sealant for windshields, as does NAPA. Should I buy one of these products or just go to home Depot and buy 100% Silicone? I kind of suspect the 100 % silicone will work fine but I'd like to get some opinions!... Randy B

#2 EcumSecumGuy

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Posted 13 November 2008 - 08:44 AM

I used the real deal - urethane from a windshield shop. Brother ran a windshield shop for awhile.

good install here:

http://www.classicco.../windshield.htm

#3 whisper

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Posted 13 November 2008 - 02:00 PM

I would recommend Black Butyl Rubber Sealant. Worked really well in my new windshield and can be applied with a caulking gun. The only down side is the stickiness but that can be overcome using mineral spirits or paint thinner to clean up. It us also used by glass shops.

#4 Randy B

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Posted 14 November 2008 - 11:42 AM

You guys aren't making this easy for me. As I understand it, urethane is the best stuff to use on standard (new) windshields. The problem is it sets up so "tough" that its really hard to remove. I'm afraid if I ever have to take the windshield out again I'll break it in the process. As for Butyl, I thought that stuff was for windshields that used clips and had a deep channel to them. I also thought that for our type set up you would use a silicone based sealant... what to do... what to do...

Randy B

#5 EcumSecumGuy

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Posted 14 November 2008 - 12:15 PM

Urethane installed is more diffiuclt to remove...but we have removed a couple using thin wire to cut through it (sorta like piano wire with handles on both ends)

I'm no expert tho. I've only done a couple.

#6 John Sheedy

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Posted 15 November 2008 - 10:18 PM

Ok boy and girls let me put my 2 cents worth in here.

You are dealing with two different types of window installs depending on what generation van you own.

First and Second generation vans have rubber gaskets holding the window in and with everything being perfect it should not need a sealer. If you install a window in this style van using a gasket and feel there maybe issues with the window channel and gasket not seating well you can apply a sealent between the gasket and body of van but not the urethane or butyl products. 3M makes the correct product part number 08509 and it is a glazing compond that comes in a cauking tube. It is a non-harding product that stays pliable and water resistant and works correctly to seal a rubber to metal application. Remember the gasket in this application is the main seal and is also what is holding the window in. If you are using a sealer in this application you are making up for rust issues or a poor window channel repair / fit. The urethane sealers are to ridged for this application and are not made for bonding a rubber to metal application.

Later generation vans (Not sure if it started in the third or fouth generation) nolonger have a gasket and are installed using a urethane or older style butyl products. These types of products are made to work with installing glass directly to the body of the car or truck. Not only do they seal they also glue the window to the channel and make a much more ridged application. Because urethane sets more ridged and is a glue using it in an older gasket application causes a lot more work to get them out, may not seal well in the long run, and could cause the windshield to crack because it gives less or not at all. The 3M number for this product is 08609 and they do make other part numbers as well but a lot of the other number applications have special cartridges that require a special gun to apply them. If you are doing a back yard job the numbers I have supplied will work with a normal cauking gun.

If you ever look at some film footage of car crashes, old ones as well as newer applications you will see why the products that hold glass in place have changed.

Older crashes if hit hard enough the window even though its safety glass would release from the body because the gasket would flex out of the channel and release the window as an assembly. The good thing back then is the roof supports were much wider and could hold up the roof of the car or truck without the window being there.

One of the problems with roof supports being wider in older applications is they created blind spots when driving. When gaskets were eliminated and the windshields got bigger to make the support pillars smaller they depended more on the glass to support the roof. The window has to stay in the car or truck during crashes even if it shatters to help keep strength in the roof. There are a lot of new car and truck applications were the front and back windows can not be taken out at the same time without supporting the roof.

I am sure there has been a lot of you that have used the newer products on your older applications and they can work but you are creating more work for yourself down the road. John
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#7 Randy B

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Posted 16 November 2008 - 05:52 AM

. If you are using a sealer in this application you are making up for rust issues or a poor window channel repair /

am sure there has been a lot of you that have used the newer products on your older applications and they can work but you are creating more work for yourself down the road. John
[/quote]


This is why I'm confused. My 1974 Ford truck manual specifically calls out using a sealer for our type windshield gaskets. I guess a better question might be: How many of you have replaced their Gen 2 windshield gaskets WITHOUT using a sealer? And if so, do you have any leaks? Also, anyone take out their new gasket years later and notice rust?

Randy B

#8 Ron

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Posted 16 November 2008 - 05:57 AM

John

Thats right I have a tube of it here I bought when I had a windshield replaced a few years ago. The guy said it had a shelf life of 20 years so I bought a tube just in case. Note when I had the windshield replaced on my 88 he put a tape on both sides from the top to the glass and told me to take it real easy for a couple of days to give the glue time to dry. He said it is possible to have the glass go flying out of the vehicle if you had to make a hard emergency stop before the glue was dry.

Ron




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